Boomers Got Little Information About D-Day and WWII

This past week marked the 75th anniversary of D-Day, June 6, 1944. It ushered in the beginning of the end of World War II in Europe and set the stage for the Boomer Generation that followed. The first boomers were born one year after the War, so memories were fresh in the minds of all adults. Yet, for most boomers, the subject of the war was rarely spoken of, if ever, in their families.

In talking to fellow boomers through the years, it is Mister Boomer’s experience that their parents — and grandparents — did not want to talk about the War. That was a closed chapter and things were moving forward; it was a new, hopeful age. Consequently, many boomers were raised without knowing what, if any, involvement their parents may have had in D-Day and World War II. Mister Boomer’s family was fortunate to not lose a family member during the War, so that fact allowed his relatives to maintain the level of silence that they wanted. An exception to the rule was a friend of Mister B’s. He knew his father was a Marine at Iwo Jima, though not once did the man speak of it in front of his son’s friends. He was a man of few words to begin with, so that did not appear strange to Mister B at the time.

In the late 1950s and early ’60s, neighbor friends of Mister B played with an army helmet, and once, one did a show-and-tell by furtively producing a bayonet that he said belonged to his father. To many boomer boys, WWII was what they saw in the movies and TV shows, like Combat! (1962-67).

Mister Boomer knew four of his uncles were in the army, but it wasn’t until he was in college that he learned anything other than that. There was a point where two of his maternal uncles no longer kept silent, and talked generally about their experiences in an artillery division. Looking back, it probably coincided with the last of their children reaching high school age. Nonetheless, details were few.

Years later, Mister B discovered two of his paternal uncles had fought in Europe, and one was there in Normandy. Only in recent years did he get information from a cousin that her father was a participant in D-Day. Mister B’s uncle was not infantry, but was more likely to be involved with setting up field headquarters immediately after the landing.

As for Mister Boomer’s father, he was drafted late in the war, and was fortunate enough to not see combat. However, he did not speak of his service, nor that of his brother and brother-in-law, until Mister Boomer was old enough to drink with them at the kitchen table. The topic of the War was something they wanted to keep to themselves. It’s possible they spoke to each other in the family’s native language, and the boomer kids would not have known. After all, they purposely kept their kids from learning to speak their parents’ language. All the better to say things around the kids without them knowing what was being said. “You’re an American,” was the only excuse they would give for not teaching the kids their native tongue. Mister B can’t help but think their War experiences fed into the desire that their children blend in.

Reports featuring soldiers who fought in WWII often show the men remembering fallen comrades, but little details of what they had endured themselves. Most downplayed their involvement, even when their boomer children came across medals or purple hearts. Now we are in a time when there are fewer eyewitnesses remaining to tell those tales. If you learned of any during your lifetime, boomers, pass the stories on to your relatives, children and grandchildren. They deserve to know the sacrifices that were made for the Boomer Generation and generations that followed. With humility and gratitude, Mister Boomer salutes you.

Did your parents speak about the War when you were young, boomers?

Boomers Learned to Deal With Passcodes

Hard to believe, but Mister Boomer does not earn enough income from his site to support the lavish lifestyle to which he and his spouse have grown accustomed. Therefore, he works a full-time job. The restrooms at his place of employment are shared by other businesses on the same floor, so the doors have keypad locks on them for access, as does the door returning to his employee space. Mister Boomer realized, after mindlessly punching in the two codes, how common it is for all boomers these days to have committed passcodes and passwords of all types to memory, to the point that they become automatic reflexes — until, one day, the brain freezes and you develop a case of CRS (can’t remember “stuff”).

According to a recent study by Intel Security, the average person keeps track of 27 passwords for email, social media accounts, banking, phone access, online shopping, health insurance, computer logins, specialty sites and more. The same study states that 37 percent of people forget a password once a week. That would explain why the vast majority do not keep entirely different passwords for every account they have, a practice that lights warning signals among security experts.

For boomers still working, the password memory test is even worse. One study stated that the average business employee had to recall 191 passwords; computer logins, email, software access, printer access in some locations, proprietary system logins, and more, to say nothing of building and restroom access. In the department of teaching old dogs new tricks, the fact that boomers went with the flow over the past twenty years, and adapted to the new environs, seems pretty impressive to Mister Boomer. Yet it certainly wasn’t always this way for boomers.

In the boomer years, Password was a game show (1961-1975), where a celebrity and a “regular” person were teamed together to face another team. Members of the team traded giving each other one-word clues to guess the secret word — the “password.” Little did we know that the show was the blueprint for cyber hackers in years to come. And none of them had to prove they weren’t a robot.

Then there was the matter of locks for school. In Mister Boomer’s experience, boomers had to supply a lock for gym class. More often than not, the lock was a Master combination lock. The combination was printed on a piece of cardboard that was attached to the lock when it was purchased. Once in use, if the cardboard was misplaced or the combination forgotten, there was only one recourse to “recover” this password: clippers the size of the Jaws of Life were brought to bear on the offending lock, which was then snipped to oblivion and ergo, the “password” was reset by buying a new lock. Fortunately for Mister Boomer, he never had to suffer the humiliation of having his gym teacher slash the lock into scrap, an action that appeared to be a form of sadistic enjoyment for the Leader of the Jocks. Consequently, Mister B was able to keep the same lock (and therefore “password” combination) for all four years.

While the gym lockers required each student to supply a lock, his high school lockers had their own built-in locks. If a student forgot the combination, a trip to the school office could retrieve the code.

Then there was Mister Boomer’s bike lock, a chain permanently attached to a barrel combination lock. The numbers rolled around a cylinder like a primitive Rubik’s cube, until the right combination of numbers opened the lock. Again, it was one Mister Boomer kept for many, many years. So, in his school days, Mister B only needed three passwords: his school locker, gym lock and bike lock. Not too tasking on a young boomer’s brain.

Recently, Mister B ran across his combination lock in a box of his memorabilia. He had, with some foresight, written the combination on a piece of paper and poked the lock through it before he had locked it for what turned out to be decades. Nonetheless as he turned the tumbler: 24 left – 4 right – 13 left – 18 right; it all came back to him when the lock snapped open. In a flashback he saw himself opening the lock over and over. Then the combination to his bike lock appeared in his mind’s eye as well. He remembered them like it was yesterday. It occurred to Mister B that if he could remember his lock combinations all these years, then he had better change some of the umpteen passwords he has today to something he already knows. You won’t tell anyone, will you?

How have you solved the ongoing dilemma of creating distinct passwords, boomers?