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Boomers Liked Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass

Mister Boomer’s mother really liked Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass. She asked her kids to buy the albums for her, playing them on the stereo that she called “the Victrola” her entire life. That is an indicator of the popularity of Herb Alpert’s band and music that spanned the generations, as well as a good indication of the mix of genres that was played on AM radio in the early 1960s. His instrumental, “feel good” horns became a staple of mid-60s TV and movies.

Alpert, with a writing partner, had a couple of minor hits as a songwriter in 1960, but a chance trip to Tijuana, Mexico inspired him to change the arrangement of an instrumental song he had been working on, called Twinkle Star, by Sol Lake. Alpert added the sounds of a bullfight and mariachi band, and renamed the tune, The Lonely Bull. He recorded the album and single with studio musicians — most notable, members of the Wrecking Crew. Herb Alpert partnered with Jerry Moss to form A & M Records to release the song in 1962. It reached No. 6 on Billboard’s Top 10, and Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass was on its way.

Alpert released additional songs with the same Mexican flair and by 1964, calls for live appearances caused him to create a touring band. The group released two albums in 1965, Whipped Cream & Other Delights and Going Places. Mister B’s mom had both albums. The Whipped Cream album was known for two reasons: first, Alpert’s version of A Taste of Honey won him the first of his six Grammy awards; and second, the album cover pictured a woman presumably covered in nothing but whipped cream. It made for fascinating imagery for a young Mister Boomer, who instantly became a fan of album art. Going Places spawned four hit singles, including Tijuana Taxi, a favorite of Mister B’s mom that she listened to more than her Andy Williams albums.

The group was everywhere — on tour, on TV specials and on the radio. In 1966, the band had five albums in the Top 20 — four in the Top 10, a feat that remains unmatched. That year, the band sold 15 million records, outselling the Beatles.

In 1968, Alpert appeared on a CBS TV special and sang a song written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David. Not possessing the strongest voice, his forte had always been instrumentals, but he wanted to sing a song to his wife. It caught on with audiences and This Guy’s In Love became Alpert’s only No. 1 single, and the first No. 1 hit on his A & M label.

A & M became a musical force in its own right, releasing music by Sergio Mendes & Brasil ’66, Stan Getz, Carole King, The Carpenters, Cat Stevens, Quincy Jones, The Police, Supertramp, Peter Frampton, Sheryl Crow and a host of others. The duo sold A & M to Polygram in 1987 for a reported $500 million, and managed the company until 1993. Alpert and Moss were recognized for their accomplishments and inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1966. They have also been inducted into the Grammy Museum’s “Icons of the Music Industry” series.

Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass did it all in less than a decade — including movie music like the theme for the original Casino Royale to their music being used in several TV game shows, most notably, The Dating Game.

Did your mom like Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass? Did you buy the band’s singles and albums, boomers?

posted by Mister B in Music,Pop Culture History and have Comments (2)

Boomers Dug Songs from “Hair”

Fifty years ago this month, the musical Hair (book and lyrics by Gerome Ragni and James Rado and music by Galt MacDermot) opened on Broadway after a short run at the off-Broadway Public Theater in New York City. Shortly after its debut in New York, simultaneous productions appeared in various cities in the U.S. as well as in London, England. To boomers, Broadway musicals tended to represent the old guard — either staid, sappy or both. Any boomer can recall the Simon and Garfunkel lyric, Is the theater really dead? (The Dangling Conversation, 1966). Then Hair came along as the first rock musical to make it to the Great White Way.

Rock music notwithstanding, it had its own level of controversy surrounding a scene in which members of the cast appeared nude if they wanted to on any given night. This one scene caused protests outside theaters around the country, and even got the play shut down more than once. For boomers growing accustomed to various forms of protest — including nudity — this wasn’t as much of an issue as it was to most boomer parents; rather, it was the music that boomers latched on to. Like popular musicals decades before, selected songs from the original cast album of Hair made their way to the radio and into boomer households. The original cast album, recorded with the off-Broadway cast in 1967 and released in 1969, hit No. 1 in the U.S. for 13 weeks, sold nearly three million copies and earned a Grammy Award for Best Score from an Original Cast Show Album. Bands and vocalists couldn’t resist covering the music, and several songs made the Top 10 in the U.S. and Great Britain.

In particular, four songs became part of boomer music history between 1968 and 1969, including the title song, Hair, Good Morning Starshine, Easy to Be Hard and Aquarius (Let the Sunshine In).

Hair
Aside from the original cast album, it was the version that The Cowsills released in 1969 that made it to a lot of boomers’ 45 RPM collections. The Cowsills were the (at various times) six brothers-a sister-and-their-mother group that was the real-life inspiration for the TV family band, The Partridge Family. That trivia aside, their version of Hair hit No. 1 for two weeks, settling in at No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 for the year, 1969.

Good Morning Starshine
Oliver (William Oliver Swofford) was an American pop singer and boomer himself. In 1969 he released Good Morning Starshine, and it propelled him to No. 3 on the U.S charts (No. 6 in Britain).

Easy to Be Hard
Though several people recorded the song besides the original cast album, including Shirley Bassey, Jennifer Warnes and Sergio Mendes and Brasil ’66, it was Three Dog Night’s 1969 version that topped the charts at No. 4. The song became their highest-charting single to that date, and is the one that boomers recall when they remember the Hair song.

Aquarius/Let The Sunshine In (The Flesh Failures)
The 5th Dimension released a 45 RPM of the song (and an album with it) in 1969. Their version was a medley of two songs from Hair: The Age of Aquarius and Let the Sunshine In (The Flesh Failures), often referred to as Aquarius or Let the Sunshine In. The band’s smooth harmonies seemed incongruous to a song medley about hippie rebellion, but it achieved No. 1 status on the Billboard Hot 100 and won the group Grammy Awards for Best Pop Vocal Performance by a Group and Record of the Year.

Mister Boomer acquired three of these singles when he received the 45 RPM collections of his brother and sister. Brother Boomer had purchased Easy to Be Hard and Aquarius/Let the Sunshine In, and his sister added the Cowsills’ Hair. Mister Boomer’s opinion after fifty years? It’s worth checking them all out for vintage nostalgia, and actually, a pretty good listen from the cast album to the most popular versions as well. Tell a hairy, bearded millennial to have a listen with you, too!

Did you buy the original cast album or any 45 RPM covers of songs from Hair, boomers?

posted by Mister B in Music,Pop Culture History and have Comment (1)

Boomers Love Dionne Warwick

When the song, Anyone Who Had a Heart, found its way into Mister Boomer’s internal Morning Jukebox — that seemingly random playing in his head of tunes from the boomer era when he wakes on most mornings (see Music Flashbacks: A Sign of an Aging Boomer? and Mister Boomer’s Morning Jukebox Update) — he realized he didn’t know much about Dionne Warwick other than the fact that she was a fixture on the charts throughout the 1960s. Mister B knew he needed to have a closer look at her career.

Not a boomer herself, Dionne Warrick was born in 1940. It was through a misspelling of her name on her first single that she came to embrace the name we know, and she continues to use it in her professional life. She began as a gospel singer, but in the 1960s crossed over into multiple genres, including soul, R&B and easy listening.

Her association with the songwriting team of Burt Bacharach and Hal David is legendary. Her decade-long partnership began when she was singing backup in a recording session for The Drifters. The tune being recorded, Mexican Divorce, was written by Bacharach. He was taken with her voice and asked her if she would record some demos with him. Bacharach signed Warwick to his production company, where she recorded a few demos that became hits for other stars, including Make It Easy on Yourself. Bacharach and David in turn signed on with Scepter Records in 1962. The owner of Scepter Records, Florence Greenberg, heard Warwick sing on Bacharach’s demo of It’s Love That Really Counts. The story goes that she said, “Forget the song, sign the girl.” (The song was given to The Shirelles as a B-side).

Her first single, written and produced by Bacharach and David and released by Scepter in 1962, was Don’t Make Me Over. It started out as the B-side to I Smiled Yesterday, but got more airplay than the A-side. By January 1963, the song peaked at #5 on the R&B charts and the team of Warwick/Bacharach/David was off to a flying start.

Anyone Who Had a Heart, the song recently playing in Mister B’s head one morning, was released as a single in 1963 and became the title track of her second album in 1964. The song was her first Top 10 hit on Billboard’s Hot 100. Warwick’s second Top 10 hit of the same year was Walk On By, which hit #1 on the R&B charts. She had four hits in 1964 alone. The team — Warwick’s voice, Bacharach’s music and David’s lyrics — went on to have more than a dozen hits in the 1960s.

From 1963 to 1971, Warwick sold an estimated 35 million albums and singles, all but one written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David. In 1968, the B-side of I Say A Little Prayer was (Theme From) Valley of the Dolls, intended for the movie of the same name. The song was written by André and Dory Previn for the film. Judy Garland had been hired to sing the song for the soundtrack, but was fired. When the movie became a hit, Warwick’s version of the the song gave her a double-sided hit. Other movie and Broadway songs written by Bacharach and David gave Warwick more hits, notably Alfie in 1966 and the Broadway musical Promises, Promises (1968), garnered Warwick two hits in addition to the title song, I Say A Little Prayer (1967) and I’ll Never Fall in Love Again (1969).

Riding the wave of popularity, Warwick was given her first TV special by CBS on September 17, 1969. Of course, Burt Bacharach was a guest star, but also appearing were Glen Campbell and Creedence Clearwater Revival.

The golden team moved from Scepter to Warner Bros. Records in 1971, awarding Warwick the largest contract for a female singer up to that time — $5 million. But she had a falling out with her songwriters in 1972. First Bacharach and David ended their association with Warwick, then with each other. Warwick, faced with breach of contract lawsuits by Warner Bros., sued the songwriting team for $5.5 million. The suit was ultimately settled out of court in 1979. After the dissolution, Warwick struggled to get on the charts until Then Came You (1974), which she recorded with The Spinners.

She had a few modest hits in the the 1970s, most notably I’ll Never Love This Way Again in 1979, when she moved from Warner Bros. to Arista Records. In 1985 she once again became a household name when she sang That’s What Friends are For with Elton John, Gladys Knight and Stevie Wonder. It was a song recorded to benefit an AIDS charity. The song was written by Burt Bacharach and Carole Bayer Sager. Between 1962 and 1998, Warwick had 56 songs make it to the Billboard Top 100.

Boomers will recall her appearances on TV, hosting Solid Gold in the ’80s and as a spokesperson for the Psychic Friends Network in the ’90s. Despite making millions, she filed for bankruptcy in 2013, owing around $10 million in business taxes to the IRS and State of California.

Mister Boomer was especially partial to the Bacharach/David songs by Dionne Warwick, and the earliest ones at that. Maybe that is why Anyone Who Had a Heart popped into his head. His mother enjoyed them all, and his brother, the prime buyer of 45s in the family, bought several of her singles.

Take a look at some of the hit singles Dionne Warwick had in the 1960s with Burt Bacharach and Hal David:

Don’t Make Me Over — 1962, her first single
Anyone Who Had a Heart — 1963
What the World Needs Now — 1963
Walk on By — 1964
You’ll Never Get to Heaven (If You Break My Heart) — 1964
What the World Needs Now — 1966; Warwick originally turned the song down and it was recorded by Jackie DeShannon in 1965. Warwick recorded it a year later.
Message to Michael — 1966
I Just Don’t Know What to Do With Myself — recorded by Dusty Springfield in 1964, Warwick’s version hit in 1966
I Say a Little Prayer — 1967
Do You Know the Way to San Jose? — 1968
(There’s) Always Something There to Remind Me — was a B-side in 1968
I’ll Never Fall in Love Again — 1969
Make It Easy on Yourself — 1970; it is said this was the song that started it all for Warwick. She sang it as part of the demos she recorded with Bacharach in 1962, but Jerry Butler released it that year when Scepter Records’ president, Florence Greenberg, gave him the Bacharach song instead of her. Feeling slighted, she went to Bacharach and David looking for support. The story goes that she shouted, “Don’t make me over, man!” at the duo, meaning she wanted a chance to sing and not be swept aside. Hal David grabbed the phrase and wrote, Don’t Make Me Over, for her, the first hit she had.

Despite her musical struggles after her split with Bacharach and David, and subsequent personal and financial troubles, she is still out there performing and recording. Mister Boomer suggests you take a look at her discography from the 1960s. It was without a doubt the decade where Warwick struck solid gold with audiences singing the music of Burt Bacharach and Hal David.

What is your favorite Dionne Warwick song, boomers?

posted by Mister B in Music and have Comment (1)

Hey, Hey, Boomers Loved “The Monkees”

Next week marks the fiftieth anniversary of a boomer-era TV anomaly: the final episode of The Monkees TV series was aired on March 25, 1968. Many boomers have forgotten or perhaps did not know that the group was actually made for the TV show, and not the other way around. The concept for the show was to be about a rock ‘n roll band looking for their big break. An ad was published in trade publications and hundreds of musicians and actors auditioned for the parts.

The four selected to play the band members were Micky Dolenz, Davy Jones, Peter Tork and Michael Nesmith — two actors and two musicians. Micky had previously appeared in the TV show, Circus Boy (1956-58), but he also sang and played guitar with several bands in the early ’60s. Davy gained his acting chops by playing The Artful Dodger in Oliver! (1964) on the London stage, and later, on Broadway. Peter was a musician who was recommended for the role by Stephen Stills. Stills was offered the job, but didn’t have any interest in doing a TV series. Instead, he took Peter Tork to the audition, telling the producers that Tork was often mistaken for him. Michael was a musician who rode to his audition on a motorcycle. He wore a wool hat to keep his hair out of his eyes on the ride, and kept it on for his screen test. The casting directors thought it was a nice quirky addition and nicknamed him “Wool Hat.” The first episode of the show refers to Michael with that nickname, and Michael’s hat became part of his persona.

NBC bought the concept in an effort to appeal to young viewers — boomers. The concept was developed and the pilot episode was written by Paul Mazursky and Larry Tucker. It aired September 12, 1966. After the initial episode, NBC took control of the writing and Mazursky and Tucker were left out. Mazursky and Tucker went on to write the film, Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice (1969) for which they were nominated for the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay. The duo also was responsible for I Love You, Alice B. Toklas! (1968) and had many other writing, acting and directing credits.

The Monkees was conceived as absurdist, surreal humor — sort of like The Marx Brothers on acid. It emulated avante garde films of the day with quick cuts, ample improvisation and breaking the fourth wall. Critics quickly compared The Monkees to The Beatles characters in A Hard Day’s Night (1964). Many saw Mickey as John, Davy as Paul, Michael as George and Peter as Ringo. The writers agreed they had been influenced by the Richard Lester film.

The boys were coached on comedy improvisation, but since it was increasingly improvised, early episodes placed sections of the four actors’ screen tests or short Q & A formats to fill remaining time. As the show progressed, time was filled with the band singing. It was those song “videos” that Mister Boomer and his sister would wait for.

Davy Jones is quoted as saying, “Ours was the kind of show you could look at or look away from — it had no deep plot. If you missed five minutes while you ate your dinner you didn’t exactly lose the whole thread, you know what I mean? It was all harmless, happy fun. No hidden meanings.”*

Mister Boomer watched the show through its entire run, like other boomers. It reminded him of The Three Stooges, but with less violence. He hadn’t seen many Marx Brothers movies at that juncture. The all-around absurdity reminded him of the Adam West Batman series that aired during the same seasons as The Monkees.

There was a lot to like about the show for boomers; girls thought Davy was cute and hung up posters of him on their bedroom walls, while boomer boys bought models of the Monkeemobile. Then there was the music. Fifty years later, boomers can still sing more of The Monkees theme song than they can of Auld Lang Syne! Mister Boomer’s sister was partial to Daydream Believer and I Want to be Free, while Mister B liked (I’m not Your) Stepping Stone, A Little Bit Me A Little Bit You and Valleri. His mother was a fan of Last Train to Clarksville.

It was only years later that Mister Boomer could fully appreciate the artistry — if one can call it that — of their performances and that of their fellow actors on that show. It wasn’t until the 1990s that Mister B saw an episode in color!

Did you watch The Monkees on TV during its original run, boomers?

*Quote appears in Mutant Monkees Meet the Masters of the Multimedia Manipulation Machine! by Davy Jones and Alan Green; Click! Publishing, 1992
posted by Mister B in Music,Pop Culture History,TV and have Comment (1)

Two More Giants of Boomer Music Are Gone

In the past two weeks, boomers have lost two greats from the world of music: Dennis Edwards and Hugh Masekela. Widely different in their approach to music, both musicians presented socially-conscious songs of the era along with other pop selections. Boomers were all the more appreciative for it, including Mister Boomer.

Dennis Edwards – February 2
Born in Alabama in 1943, Edwards grew up in Detroit. Like most of his musical contemporaries, he sang gospel and studied music as a teen. In the early sixties, he was a member of the Contours, best known for Do You Love Me (1962). After the Temptations fired David Ruffin in 1968, Edwards became the lead singer. His gritty vocal moved the band’s sound to a more bluesy, soulful direction, inspiring the group to pen more socially-conscious songs.

Edwards presided over some of the Temptations biggest hits, including Cloud Nine, Psychedelic Shack, Ball of Confusion, I Can’t Get Next to You and Papa was a Rollin’ Stone (Mister Boomer’s favorite). Edwards left the band in 1976 following their separation from the Motown label. During his tenure, every album the band released made it to the Top 40, with several entering the Top 10. He was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1989, along with the Temptations.

He released several albums on his own, but none crossed over from R&B to the pop charts. He rejoined the band when they returned to Motown in the early ’80s, then left, then came back for another year in 1986 for one album. Finally, he rejoined the band one more time from 1987 to 1989.

Hugh Masekela – January 23
Mr. Masekela began life in South Africa in 1939. At the age of fourteen, he showed a keen interest in music, but his family could not afford an instrument. A local minister, on tour in the U.S. promoting his book, mentioned Hugh’s predicament to a radio host. The man suggested he get in touch with Louis Armstrong. The minister did just that and Armstrong agreed to give him a trumpet to give the boy back in South Africa. From then on, Hugh Masekela was never separated from his music. By the 1950s, he began to develop his brand of Afro-Jazz. Years later he would be known as the Father of South African Jazz.

After criticizing the South African apartheid government with his music, he left for New York in 1960 for what would become a 30-year exile. In New York he enrolled in the Manhattan School of Music and was a big fan of the city’s jazz scene. He frequented the jazz clubs to see Miles Davis, John Coltraine, Thelonious Monk, Charlie Mingus and Max Roach. Subsequently he became friends with Dizzy Gilespie and Louis Armstrong, who suggested he draw on his African experiences rather than rely on influences from American music.

Masekela’s debut album, Trumpet Africaine: The New Beat from South Africa, was released in 1963. In 1964 he married singer Miriam Makeba, but divorced two years later. By 1967 he was living in Los Angeles, having befriended David Crosby, Stephen Stills, Graham Nash and Neil Young and others. His LA friends got him a slot in the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival, alongside Janis Joplin, Otis Redding, Ravi Shankar, The Who and Jimi Hendrix.

His biggest break came in 1968, with the release of Grazing in the Grass, an instrumental composed by Philemon Hou. The song reached number one on the Billboard charts, crossing all boundaries between rock, jazz and pop. Mister Boomer recalls his brother bringing the 45 RPM record home. It was a catchy tune that all members of the Boomer household could enjoy. Mister B has that 45 in his collection today.

One year later, Harry Elston of the band, The Friends of Distinction, wrote lyrics to the tune. Their cover of the song peaked at number three in the Billboard Top 100 in 1969. Lyrically a throwback to the vernacular of the time, the song featured such mind-blowing phrases such as, Grazin’ in the grass is a gas, baby, can you dig it. Mister B will stick with Masekela’s instrumental, thank you.

Hugh Masekela was a bandleader, composer, singer, trumpet player and flugelhornist. In 1977, He wrote Soweto Blues about the 1976 uprising in Soweto, South Africa, a song that his ex-wife went on to sing at the beginning of the Paul Simon Graceland tour in 1986. Masekela had been criticized for collaborating with Simon on the Graceland album, and the tour got a smattering of a few hundred protestors in London, because some people felt Simon’s work for the album in South Africa violated the United Nations cultural boycott against that country. Masekela insisted that Simon’s album did the opposite, bringing the plight of his beloved South Africans to the forefront of world discussion.

By the 1990s, Hugh Masekela had been married four times. His lack of success in marriages was countered by his musical prowess. He released over 40 albums, and worked with many of the top artists of the time, including Harry Belafonte, Dizzy Gillespie, The Byrds, Fela Kuti, Marvin Gaye, Herb Alpert, Paul Simon and Stevie Wonder, among others.

The passing of these two musical giants once again illustrates how musical genres criss-crossed among pop, rock, R&B and jazz in the sixties, especially on the radio; the same stations that played 1910 Fruitgum Company and Cream would also play Ray Charles and Hugo Montenegro. Consequently, boomers were exposed to artists and sounds from around the globe to build what became, in Mister Boomer’s opinion, the greatest decade of American music in history.

Did you have the chance to see Dennis Edwards or Hugh Masekela in concert, boomers? Which records do you cherish?

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Boomers Liked Some Spiritual Messages Mixed in With Their Pop Music

Edwin Hawkins passed away last week at the age of 74. If his name sounds familiar, it’s probably because you are a boomer who recalls Hawkins’ one hit, Oh Happy Day, from 1969.
He wrote the song as part of an album intended to be sold as a fund-raiser for his church to attend a gospel competition. A local San Francisco radio station began playing the song and it got the attention of listeners. The song was re-released under the group’s new name, the Edwin Hawkins Singers. It sold more than seven million copies and won a Grammy Award for best soul gospel performance. Though it was the group’s only Top 10 hit, they toured, sang gospel and in 1970, backed up Melanie on her hit, Lay Down (Candles in the Rain).

Rock music was always an amalgam of gospel, rhythm & blues and jazz from the start. Many of rock’s earliest stars — including Elvis Presley — got their start singing gospel in their churches. The country had self-identified as predominantly Christian for a few decades before the Boomer Generation. According to a Gallup poll published in 2005, the U.S. Christian population peaked in the mid-50s at around 92 percent. So it should come as no surprise that gospel-tinged tunes found their way into the charts during the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s. Here are a few of the many that got the attention of boomers listening to their transistor radios and 45 RPM records:

Turn! Turn! Turn! (To Everything There Is a Season)
Written by Pete Seeger in the 1950s, it was first released on an album by the Limeliters in 1962, then by Seeger himself, then the Byrds had a Number One hit with it in 1965. The lyrics were adapted from the English version of the first eight verses of the third chapter of the biblical Book of Ecclesiastes. No boomer collection of Byrds tunes would be complete without it.

People Get Ready
Curtis Mayfield & the Impressions recorded this tune in 1965. The soul and gospel-tinged song has an overtly Christian religious theme but Mayfield himself said he wrote it as a response to what was happening in the Civil Rights Movement after he attended the March on Washington, heard Martin Luther King’s I Have A Dream speech, and the subsequent church bombings in Alabama. Ultimately, it was a song about redemption and triumph over evil. Mister Boomer always enjoyed the melody and Mayfield’s soulful voice.

Sympathy for the Devil
The Rolling Stones released this rock classic in 1968. Mick Jagger sang as the devil in this song about temptation. The lyric content took a back seat to an incredibly danceable beat.

Spirit in the Sky
It was the infectious and memorable fuzz-guitar theme that propelled Norman Greenbaum’s one-hit wonder to the charts for sixteen weeks spanning the two decades between 1969 and ’70. It sold over two million copies. Mister Boomer’s sister bought the 45 RPM, and it is now in Mister Boomer’s collection.

Put Your Hand in the Hand
Written by Gene MacLellan, it was first recorded by Canadian artist Anne Murray for her third album, Honey, Wheat and Laughter in 1970. It became a hit for fellow Canadian band, Ocean, in 1971. A slew of popular recording artists released their version of the song in the years that followed, including Bing Crosby, Joan Baez and Loretta Lynn, to name a few.

Jesus Is Just Alright
The Byrds released the tune in 1969, but most boomers will remember the re-recorded 1975 version by the Doobie Brothers. As with all of the spiritually-themed music of the era, it was the music and not the lyric content that caught the ear of boomers. Catchy tunes climbed the charts, regardless of whether they had any spiritual message.

There were dozens of other songs that mentioned God or the Christian religion in some way, by almost all of the popular recording artists of the day. As the stream of these tunes on the charts started to fade in the late sixties, some say the excesses of “free love” and “turn on, tune in, drop out” culminated with the rock musical Hair in 1968. That counterculture was then countered itself with more religious-themed rock of the 1970s. As art imitates life, it brought us the Broadway musicals, Jesus Christ Superstar in 1970 and Godspell in 1972. Anne Murray’s version of the title song Jesus Christ Superstar was on the charts in 1971 and then was followed by covers by several people. I Don’t Know How to Love Him from JC Superstar was also on the charts in 1971 and the Broadway cast performance of Day by Day from Godspell hit Billboard’s #13 in 1972.

The numbers of almost all religious denominations has been steady falling since the end of the Boomer Generation. The number of people in the U.S. identifying as Christian has dropped to around 70 percent as more people are checking the “no religious affiliation” box these days. It is Mister Boomer’s contention that it was always the criteria that kids used on American Bandstand to rate records that indicated which songs made it to the Top 10: is it a catchy tune and can you dance to it? Nonetheless, you’ll find predominantly Christian religious-tinged tunes still hitting the Top 10 from time to time, on the Rock, Rhythm & Blues and Country charts.

Do you own any of the religious-themed records from the fifties, sixties or seventies, boomers? Did you buy them for the music or religious content?

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