Boomers Watched the World Series In Early October

They say timing is everything. It doesn’t seem to matter if “they” are talking about comedy, planting crops or running for political office; timing is certainly near the top of the list. Yet, to paraphrase Einstein, timing is relative. A case in point is the timing of Major League Baseball’s World Series. Mister Boomer noticed that in the schedule for this year, if there is a Game 7 required, it will be played on October 31. Halloween!

If games had been played on Halloween in our boomer years, there would have been a lot of young boys carrying transistor radios and peering into living rooms for a glimpse of the score as they went trick or treating. Back then, the Series was played earlier in the month. Before 1961, MLB had a 154 game schedule. After 1961, 162 games were played, the same as now. Nonetheless, then as now, the season officially ended on September 30. So what changed? The playoff system in the post-season pushed it further back on the calendar.

In our boomer years, the team from the American League with the best record would meet their counterpart from the National League in the World Series. That system had been in play for decades. In 1961, the Leagues expanded by two teams each, but the post-season schedule remained. In 1969, each League expanded again, this time to 12 teams each. The expansion of the number of teams meant divisions were necessary, making it far more likely that the teams with the best records would not necessarily face each other in the World Series. It was decided that Division Playoffs would give the fans more chances to see their favorite teams in action, and be a more equitable method for determining the best, all the while enriching the coffers of Major League Baseball. In 1994, the Wild Card system was instituted, paving the way to where we are today.

The last members of the Boomer Generation arrived in 1964. That year, The New York Yankees faced the St. Louis Cardinals in the World Series. The Series was a battle that required a Game 7. That determining game was played in St. Louis on October 15, 1964. And so it was throughout the boomer years. By October 15, it was all over except for the bragging rights of the winning city and the sweeping up of the fallen leaves of defeat.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aqa7k3axEC0
The St. Louis Cardinals defeated the New York Yankees in Game 7 of the 1964 World Series. Notice how the players are wearing short sleeves on October 15. Will players be able to do that on Halloween this year?

Mister Boomer was a big baseball fan in his preteen years, visiting the ballpark several times during each season. His state had a Major League team, and his father was a big fan. Mister B went to games with his father and, a couple of times per year, with his Little League team. However, post-season games were not among the games he attended. His enthusiasm waned by the time he was old enough to drive to the stadium. Perhaps it was the rigors of high school and his first jobs, or that kids in the neighborhood began heading off to different high schools, but his love of the game faded along with the neighborhood pick-up games.

Boomers, however, do appear to still love the game. Though its popularity has waned since the decades of the Boomer Generation, half of the fans of the sport are now over age 50. The World Series now receives about one-eighth the viewing audience of the Super Bowl. Nonetheless, there is a strange dichotomy in that baseball enjoys more live attendance than any other sport. Recent years have put live attendance records at over 70 million. And audience for the televised World Series, though down appreciably from the boomer heyday of the 1950s and ’60s, still wins the night over other broadcasts.

Younger kids are not playing baseball in the same numbers they once did, and the proliferation of multiple sources of viewing entertainment cuts into the possible viewership for baseball. The popularity of baseball, no longer considered the national pastime, continues to slowly fade. Yet there used to be a season for each thing. It was predictable and helped define the calendar, giving people something to look forward to between events. Today, at this writing, football season has begun before baseball has finished its regular games. If timing is everything, then somebody should look into that Halloween Game 7 problem.

Did you attend post-season games at your MLB stadium, boomers?

Boomers and Mister Boomer Played Baseball

While recently walking to meet friends in a nearby park, Mister Boomer happened upon a Little League baseball game in progress. It immediately transported him 50-plus years back to his stint in Little League in the early 1960s.

Boys in Mister B’s neighborhood were obsessed with baseball in any form, from sandlot to Little League to the majors. Baseball card collecting was a huge part of their daily discussions. They’d trade cards among themselves and put duplicates or lesser-player cards in the spokes of their bicycles, which they rode to the baseball fields for all-day games during the summer. So it was understood that the first chance a boy had to play team baseball, he’d try out. A boy could play four years of Little League, then go on to Pony League play as a teen. Worst case scenario, city recreation baseball was open to all, regardless of ability.

Thus it was that Mister Boomer came to play organized team baseball. He had tried out for Little League, but failed to get picked up by a team. Instead, he and a couple of school  friends signed up for the city league. The teams in the city league could choose their own names, so after much debate, the boys decided on a name that was inspirational and timely; they would be known as The Astronauts. While the season gave Mister B practical team experience, it wasn’t Little League, with their formal uniforms and dedicated practice times. So the following year, Mister B tried out for Little League again, and this time, was put on a team that was sponsored by a local drug store.

A neighborhood kid was on the same team, so the boys would ride their bikes to practices and games together. The season started before school was out for summer, so time was tight getting home from school, wolfing down some dinner and riding to the field. Most of the team was already at the field when Mister Boomer arrived and parked his bike. A few minutes later the coach called the boys together to announce the line-up. His side was to be the home team in this game, so they would be in the field first. Mister Boomer was assigned right field, and would be batting fifth.

The first inning began without incident, and in short order Mister B’s team was at bat. The lead-off boy hit a ground ball up the middle and was safely on first base. The second batter hit a pop-up fly ball for the first out. The next batter hit another single, advancing the original runner to third base. Mister Boomer waited in the on-deck circle, wondering if he would get his turn at bat when the fourth batter was given a walk. That meant as Mister Boomer stepped into the batter’s box for his first official Little League at bat, the bases were loaded with one out.

Mister Boomer felt his heart racing, and, as many movies have described, he experienced a slowdown in time. He watched as the pitcher did his wind-up, but it appeared to be in slow motion. Mister Boomer glanced at the first base coach, as instructed, and was given the go-ahead to hit at will. Mister B hated to let any ball go by if he thought it was within his hitting range. He watched as the ball left the hand of the pitcher and was coming in a little high and to the outside of the strike zone, but Mister B was determined to give it a swing. Visions of hitting a ground ball to the infield that could be turned into a double play and end the inning rushed through his head, but he powered the bat in an arc that just barely missed the sweet spot. As a right-handed batter, the slight undercut of the ball, coupled with a minute late swing, caused it to acquire a fly ball trajectory into the opposite direction — right field.

As Mister Boomer dropped the bat and ran furiously toward first base, he could see the surprised look on the right fielder’s face as the ball sailed over his head. The first base coach was signaling Mister B to “go, go, go” as the right fielder picked up the ball in the grass and threw it as hard as he could — toward first base but over the first baseman’s head. Team members scrambled to get the ball, which was now in the area where parents had parked their folding chairs. Mister B could hear the air rushing through the earholes of his helmet as he peered back to see what was going on, and promptly tripped over second base. Falling face first into the dirt, shouts of “Get up! Go, go, go!” echoed though his head as he got to his feet and ran toward third base. The throw was nowhere near third base, and ended up in left field as Mister Boomer saw the third base coach waving him in to home with a windmill turn of his arm. Mister B kicked it into high gear and stepped across home plate as the throw came in to the catcher. He had a hit at his first time at bat in Little League, and it was an inside-the-park home run.

More than a home run, he had a grand slam home run, with four runs being scored. He was elated as he was greeted by his teammates and parents of fellow team members cheered. Mister B played the rest of the game in a fog, despite getting a couple more hits. His team won handily, but after the game was over, he was informed that his grand slam was the result of the other team being charged with three errors, and that took a little wind out of his sails. But he was happy he had a hit in his first at bat, and it was a home run.

Mister Boomer went on to play three years in Little League on the same team, and had the chance to play every position but catcher and pitcher. His combined batting average was over .400 and he learned to bat equally well as a left hander as right, giving his coach another weapon in the battle for diamond supremacy. In his second year, the team made it to the playoff games. Mister B was proud to be able to move to a field with real team dugouts, visitor stands and beautifully manicured grass, but his team was eliminated in the first round.

Baseball was a big part of Mister Boomer’s early life, but as soon as he entered high school, he stopped playing in any form, as neighborhood kids were all off in different directions, and dreams of learning how to drive appeared on the horizon.

Did baseball — or another sport — occupy your summer vacations, boomers?