Boomers Knew Signs of the Times

It occurred to Mister Boomer that our generation knew and employed hand gestures — signs of the times, if you will — that became identified with our generation. Some we inherited from previous generations and carried on the tradition, while others we adapted and made our own.

Pee-yeew!
The symbol for “something is not smelling right” is a thumb and index finger grasping one’s nose. A gesture often used by children, it could under those circumstances relate to personal proximity to a gaseous presence, often emanating from a sibling. When performed behind the back of the alleged offender, often an adult, it was a “man, this stinks” statement to surrounding siblings or classroom pals.
In later years, it was used to describe the stench of polluted air. Occasionally it was used as a metaphor to protest government action that, to the protester, meant “something stinks here.”

Peace Sign
Perhaps the hand gesture that is most often identified with the Baby Boomer generation, this sign of the times consisted of lifting the first two fingers of a hand to form a “V.” Similar to a Boy Scout oath-taking hand gesture, it differed in the separation of the fingers.
Most people know that Winston Churchill utilized the gesture as a rallying symbol to mean “V for Victory” during the second World War. Yet there is evidence of its use as a symbol of victory as far back as the 1400s. Two boomer-era presidents — Dwight Eisenhower and Richard Nixon — were known to raise both arms fully extended in a “V for Victory” stance in political rallies.
Boomers adapted it as a sign of peace during protests of the Vietnam War, a symbol simply stating, “All we are saying, is give peace a chance.” It became identified with pacifists and hippies, but survived and spread beyond the counter culture.

Roll Down Your Window
Boomers know the sign to ask the person in the next car to roll down their window is a hand grasping an invisible handle that is then rotated repeatedly. It was an indication of the manual method most people were required to perform to raise or lower a window inside a car.
Most often used at stoplights, it could be utilized to ask for directions, or in the case of boomers, more often to talk to members of the opposite sex. It might also be used to invite the other driver to race when the light changed.

Boomers recall Mike Myers immortalizing the gesture in the 1992 movie, Wayne’s World. When his character and his cohort Garth (Dana Carvey) pull alongside a Rolls Royce at a stoplight, he does the hand gesture to ask the other car’s occupant if he has any Grey Poupon — a spoof of a popular TV commercial of that time.

Check, Please
Everyone knows a hand wave in a restaurant is meant to gain the attention of a server, most often to indicate that the meal is complete and the bill is requested. It can be a simple raised hand and arm like a student in a classroom, or a hand waving. It is often seen as a hand holding an unseen pen and writing in the air.
This hand gesture did not start with Baby Boomers, but Mister B is including it here because the concept of middle class families enjoying fine dining was mostly unknown in the early part of the Baby Boom. As the middle class grew in the 1950s and ’60s, it has been Mister B’s anecdotal experience that families went to restaurants mainly on special occasions. Boomers would see their fathers perform the gesture at the end of a Mother’s Day meal, and, a few years later when going to a restaurant became an option for dating, employed the hand sign themselves.

Middle Finger Salute
Another symbol that has a long history around the globe, boomers embraced this insult gesture as their own. There was no greater way to express rebellion against the Establishment than to perform the obscene gesture of raising a middle finger, whether that was aimed at the grown-ups from previous generation, at teachers or government.
By the 1970s, the gesture had been overused for all sorts of mundane occasions, diluting the earlier insult and shock factor that drew a separation line between generations.

How about you, boomers? Do you recall these or other hand gestures that you think of as signs of our time?

Boomers Then and Now — Quarantine Edition

Inspired by the Monkees song That Was Then, This Is Now, from 1986, Mister Boomer takes a look back to the way we were for a glimpse at the times of your lives (do you remember?), ever cognizant that was yesterday, and yesterday’s gone. Maybe he’s been sheltering in place a little too long? You be the judge.

THEN:
Revved the car’s engine and peeled out in the street to impress a girl.
NOW:
Peeled grapes so the skins wouldn’t get stuck in your bridgework.

THEN:
Saved nickels and dimes to buy 45 RPM records.
NOW:
Wish you’d saved more than nickels and dimes, and wish you were 45 again.

THEN:
Snuck out of your parents’ house to go to a rock concert.
NOW:
Snuck an extra glass of schnapps before calling it a night.

THEN:
Toilet papered a classmate’s car from bumper to bumper — including the tires — as a graduation prank.
NOW:
With not a square to spare, who knew toilet paper would be like gold?

THEN:
A burger, fries and a Coke (or Pepsi) was a quick, on-the-go meal.
NOW:
Have to decide if it’s worth it to get dressed and take the car to the drive-thru for lunch.

THEN:
Kept an eye out for the latest groovy fashions.
NOW:
Keep an eye out for elastic waistbands.

THEN:
Participated in a dozen protest marches in a single month.
NOW:
Protested to the supermarket manager a dozen times in the past month that the check out register wasn’t ringing up the sale price.

THEN:
Had a make-out session at a drive-in movie.
NOW:
Fell asleep watching an on-demand movie.

THEN:
Watched The Jetsons and wished you had some of those space-age gadgets.
NOW:
Had just about enough technology and video calls for awhile.

THEN:
Strived to stop and smell the roses.
NOW:
Never want to hear Slow down, you move too fast/you got to make the morning last … again.

THEN:
You helped your grandparents to get rid of the flashing 12:00 on their VCR.
NOW:
Your grandkids are helping you navigate Zoom.

What Then and Now comparisons are blowing through the jasmine in your mind these days, boomers?