Boomers Lose a Second Everly Brother

Don Everly, the lower-register harmony voice of the duo, the Everly Brothers, died this week. Don was usually the lead singer of the group. He was the older brother to Phil (who died in 2014; see Mister Boomer’s Bye, Bye Love: Another Boomer Icon Has Passed).

As previously noted, Chet Atkins was instrumental in getting the brothers their first record deal, and the duo burst on the scene in 1957 with Bye Bye Love. They had a string of Top Ten hits in the late fifties and early sixties.

Both brothers enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1961, and shortly after boot camp, performed in uniform on The Ed Sullivan Show, singing Crying In the Rain. They were released from the Marine Corps in 1962, after six months of service. The popularity of their brand of country/folk/rock was fading as the British Invasion hit the U.S. in 1964, but the brothers continued to record and perform.

The duo famously broke up in mid-concert in 1973 when brother Phil walked off the stage. It is reported the brothers did not speak to each other for a decade. However, they did reunite for a concert in 1983, recorded a new album a year later, and performed together occasionally for another decade.

In 2018, Phil’s surviving family filed a copyright claim to half the royalties of the song, Cathy’s Clown (written in 1960). Don sued the estate of his brother to reclaim his copyright, stating that Phil signed a release giving up his rights to the song and acknowledged that Don was the sole writer of the song. The two brothers were listed as co-writers on the record and shared in royalties until 1980.

Known for their harmonies, the brothers also penned several songs together, though their biggest hits were written by others. They also are listed as sole songwriters on several tunes that became hits for other bands. For instance, Phil wrote their classic tune, When Will I Be Loved (1960), which became a huge hit for Linda Ronstadt in 1975.

Songs Don wrote:
(Till) I Kissed You – 1959; Chet Atkins played guitar on the record, and Jerry Allison of the Crickets played drums
Cathy’s Clown – 1960; *disputed by Phil, who claimed the two of them wrote it together
So Sad (To Watch Good Love Go Bad) – 1960; it was recorded by several artists in the 1960s and ’70s
The Facts of Life -1964
The Drop Out – 1964
I Used to Love You – 1965
Why Wasn’t I Born Rich? – 1967; recorded by Cliff Richard

(Till) I Kissed You and Cathy’s Clown were bona fide hits for the brothers. The others failed to chart or were released by other country, R&B or rock groups.

The brothers were inducted into the inaugural class of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1986, and were given a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1997.

Mister Boomer has a personal connection to songs by the Everly Brothers, as previously mentioned when Phil passed away. His appreciation of their music has expanded as an adult, and he can see why so many artists and bands of the early days of rock and roll were so influenced by their sound.

Do you have fond memories of listening to the Everly Brothers? Did you take sides in the battle of the brothers, boomers?

 

Boomers Didn’t Know the ABCs of SPF

It’s summertime. While the living may or may not be easy in your neck of the woods, if you spend much time in the sun, it is advisable to wear sunscreen protection. That wasn’t a major concern in our boomer years. Back then, the main objective was to limit sunburn, especially in children. The degree to which your mother applied any sunscreen product was probably proportionate to how susceptible you were to getting badly sunburned. However, there was a parallel course of action being followed by teens and adults, and that was purposely accelerating the sun’s effects to get tanned instead of actively fighting the effects of the sun’s rays.

The pendulum of beauty has swung back and forth through the centuries when it comes to the color of summer skin. Pale skin was prized in many cultures as a symbol of class and status; it meant you were not a laborer toiling in the hot sun. Forms of sunscreen using zinc oxide and titanium oxide were used in the 1920s and ’30s to block the sun’s rays and UV radiation, while at the same time fashion icon Coco Chanel was extolling the aesthetic virtue of bronzed skin. By the late 1950s, when boomers were coming of age, the pendulum was on the side of tanning. Despite scientific knowledge of the effects of the sun’s radiation for decades, these effects were not widely known by the general public.

Sunscreen was not a new invention during the boomer years. Some form of sun protection was used as far back as recorded history. The ancient Egyptians used a paste made of plants, grains and herbs, while the ancient Greeks tried olive oil. Flash forward a few millennia and you’ve got boomers on beaches slathering on baby oil. Yikes! Somehow the words “oil” and “heat” don’t add up to anything good. To confuse matters more, there were three basic types of out-in-the-sun products: tanning lotion or oil; sunblock; and sunscreen. Together they ran the gamut from little-to-no sun protection to the best available sun protection for the time.

Two of the the most popular brands of products sold during the boomer years were from Coppertone and Bain de Soleil. Both companies got their original formulation from a Navy airman who created his substance in 1944 to protect soldiers fighting in the hot sun of the Pacific during World War II. Nonetheless, Bain de Soleil actually began selling its “orange gelĂ©e” in Paris in the mid-1920s, building a business on the first-adopters of wealthy Europeans and celebrities visiting the beaches of the French Riviera.

The Coppertone Company officially came into being in 1951, adapting the original formula to be perfectly poised to take advantage of the burgeoning baby boom. The iconic image of the puppy pulling on the little girl’s swimsuit bottom to reveal her untanned skin first appeared in 1953.

Bain de Soleil brand began selling a product line in the U.S. after the War. Ownership of both companies changed hands multiple times through the years, but as of 2014, both brands are owned and marketed by the Bayer Corporation.

One thing that was invented during the boomer years was the Sun Protection Factor (SPF) system. It was developed in 1962 and appeared on some products, like Bain de Soleil, by 1964. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) adopted sunscreen labeling standards in 1978, using SPF as a way for consumers to know a specific measure of how much of the sun’s radiation was reaching their skin. An SPF of 20 indicated that fractional amount (1/20) of the sun’s UVB burning radiation reaching the skin. In boomer years, SPF products were available labeled from 5 to 20. In the 1990s, the range increased to 15 to 50+. The FDA guidelines of 2012 proposed 50 as the upper limit since there is little evidence that higher SPF numbers equate to more protection. Currently, both the U.S. and Europe suggest using a sunscreen labeled as broad-spectrum for protection against both UVA (“a” as in skin aging) and UVB (“b” as in burning).

How about you, boomers? Did you use tanning oil (or baby oil), sunblock or sunscreen on your family picnics, vacations and beach outings?