It’s Mister Boomer’s Tenth Anniversary!

In the pre-summer, halcyon days of a decade ago, an idea took shape and was realized. After establishing and building out a website in the week before, Mister Boomer published his first post on June 6, 2010. Misterboomer.com was going to be a place of nostalgia, history and personal recollections that would hopefully bridge a connection of the times between Mister Boomer and ultimately, the shared experiences of the Boomer Generation.

Mister Boomer has been fond of reminding boomers that our generation has witnessed a tremendous amount of history: cultural, political and every other “…al” you can think of. Since his inaugural post, our generation has transitioned to a senior population and well, what a long, strange trip it has been.

Yet those are stories for another day. Today we celebrate what misterboomer.com has been able to achieve, thanks to you, our loyal readers. Mister B thought long and hard about how he would mark this occasion. Top 10 lists and favorite posts? Been there, done that. Should we mark the occasion by calling out what is actually happening outside Mister B’s door this very day? Today’s Black Lives Matter certainly echoes years of Civil Rights protest that boomers experienced fifty years ago as children and teens. At the same time, the country is under attack by a virus that does not stop at national borders, and is disproportionately affecting older Americans — including boomers — and especially black and brown Americans. There’s certainly connections to be made to both subjects, and perhaps Mister B will research them for another time.

On this day, he simply wanted to remember the way it all started, with a post about a practically universal experience for boomers: a bowl of sugary cereal. Without further ado, here is an encore presentation of Mister B’s very first post about Kellogg’s Sugar Pops, yellow milk and all:

The Sweet Taste of Success

Boomers Knew Signs of the Times

It occurred to Mister Boomer that our generation knew and employed hand gestures — signs of the times, if you will — that became identified with our generation. Some we inherited from previous generations and carried on the tradition, while others we adapted and made our own.

Pee-yeew!
The symbol for “something is not smelling right” is a thumb and index finger grasping one’s nose. A gesture often used by children, it could under those circumstances relate to personal proximity to a gaseous presence, often emanating from a sibling. When performed behind the back of the alleged offender, often an adult, it was a “man, this stinks” statement to surrounding siblings or classroom pals.
In later years, it was used to describe the stench of polluted air. Occasionally it was used as a metaphor to protest government action that, to the protester, meant “something stinks here.”

Peace Sign
Perhaps the hand gesture that is most often identified with the Baby Boomer generation, this sign of the times consisted of lifting the first two fingers of a hand to form a “V.” Similar to a Boy Scout oath-taking hand gesture, it differed in the separation of the fingers.
Most people know that Winston Churchill utilized the gesture as a rallying symbol to mean “V for Victory” during the second World War. Yet there is evidence of its use as a symbol of victory as far back as the 1400s. Two boomer-era presidents — Dwight Eisenhower and Richard Nixon — were known to raise both arms fully extended in a “V for Victory” stance in political rallies.
Boomers adapted it as a sign of peace during protests of the Vietnam War, a symbol simply stating, “All we are saying, is give peace a chance.” It became identified with pacifists and hippies, but survived and spread beyond the counter culture.

Roll Down Your Window
Boomers know the sign to ask the person in the next car to roll down their window is a hand grasping an invisible handle that is then rotated repeatedly. It was an indication of the manual method most people were required to perform to raise or lower a window inside a car.
Most often used at stoplights, it could be utilized to ask for directions, or in the case of boomers, more often to talk to members of the opposite sex. It might also be used to invite the other driver to race when the light changed.

Boomers recall Mike Myers immortalizing the gesture in the 1992 movie, Wayne’s World. When his character and his cohort Garth (Dana Carvey) pull alongside a Rolls Royce at a stoplight, he does the hand gesture to ask the other car’s occupant if he has any Grey Poupon — a spoof of a popular TV commercial of that time.

Check, Please
Everyone knows a hand wave in a restaurant is meant to gain the attention of a server, most often to indicate that the meal is complete and the bill is requested. It can be a simple raised hand and arm like a student in a classroom, or a hand waving. It is often seen as a hand holding an unseen pen and writing in the air.
This hand gesture did not start with Baby Boomers, but Mister B is including it here because the concept of middle class families enjoying fine dining was mostly unknown in the early part of the Baby Boom. As the middle class grew in the 1950s and ’60s, it has been Mister B’s anecdotal experience that families went to restaurants mainly on special occasions. Boomers would see their fathers perform the gesture at the end of a Mother’s Day meal, and, a few years later when going to a restaurant became an option for dating, employed the hand sign themselves.

Middle Finger Salute
Another symbol that has a long history around the globe, boomers embraced this insult gesture as their own. There was no greater way to express rebellion against the Establishment than to perform the obscene gesture of raising a middle finger, whether that was aimed at the grown-ups from previous generation, at teachers or government.
By the 1970s, the gesture had been overused for all sorts of mundane occasions, diluting the earlier insult and shock factor that drew a separation line between generations.

How about you, boomers? Do you recall these or other hand gestures that you think of as signs of our time?