Boomers Born in 1961 Reach Age 60 This Year

Boomers born in the year 1961 will reach their 60th birthday this year. Time flies when you’re having fun! All boomers know that life is profoundly different today in many ways than it was in 1961. Here are some stats that present a picture of what our lives were like 60 years ago:

John Fitzgerald Kennedy was inaugurated as President of the United States, succeeding President Dwight D. Eisenhower
• There were about 184 million people in the U.S.; the population jumped by 28 million in ten years (thanks to the Baby Boomers!)
• To continue the Baby Boom, 1.5 million couples were married in 1961; the average age of a bride was 19-20 yrs. old, and the groom was 21-22 yrs. old.
The average annual income was $5,700
$1 in 1961 is approximately equal to $8.80 today
• The cost of a dozen eggs was 57¢
Milk was 50¢ for a half gallon
Ground beef was 52¢ lb.
It cost 41¢ lb. to buy a frying chicken
• If you wanted to mail a letter, a stamp cost 4¢
• Born in 1961? You share a birth year with Eddie Murphy (April 3) and George Clooney (May 6)
Alan Shepard became the first American in Space (May 5)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a3cpyNZkWKU

President Kennedy announced the goal of landing a man on the moon and bringing him home by the end of the decade (May 25)
The Apartment won the Best Picture Academy Award
The Bullwinkle Show debuted
Tossin’ and Turnin’ by Bobby Lewis was the number 1 hit single of 1961
Disney released 101 Dalmations in theaters
• IBM introduced the Selectric typewriter

The Berlin Wall was constructed, further escalating the Cold War
Sprite was introduced by Coca-Cola to compete with 7-Up
Ray Kroc bought a small chain of hamburger restaurants from the McDonald brothers
President Kennedy sent in the first advisors into Vietnam
Marvel introduced The Fantastic Four comics
Roger Marris broke Babe Ruth’s record and hit 61 home runs for the New York Yankees

If you were born in 1961, of course you learned about these things later in life. Yet more than half the Boomer Generation was born before 1961, and they have vivid memories of the year. Mister Boomer was in elementary school and remembers many things about 1961, including watching the inauguration of President Kennedy. The school he attended was big on observing American history-in-the-making, and wanted the students to follow the Space Program, beginning with Alan Shepard’s launch on May 5. A TV was rolled into the classroom for subsequent launches of Project Mercury and on to Project Gemini.

Mister B and his family were also big fans of Rocky & Bullwinkle, including the 1961 iteration of The Bullwinkle Show. Of course, he was not able to view the show in color. It was the mid-1970s before the family got a hand-me-down color television.

If you’ve been reading Mister Boomer for even a short time, then you know he definitely remembers hearing some top hits of 1961 on his transistor radio. Out of that tiny speaker, he heard Tossin’ and Turnin’, but also, I Fall to Pieces by Patsy Cline; Runaway by Del Shannon; Dedicated to the One I Love by the Shirelles; Take Good Care of My Baby by Bobby Vee; Travelin’ Man by Ricky Nelson, and many, many more.

Yet, in retrospect, what a good portion of boomers recall about 1961 is that there was a palpable change in the wind. Life as we had come to know it was about to be turned upside down. By the time the earliest-born boomers reached the age of 18 in 1964 — which was the final year of the Baby Boom — music, fashion, world events, Civil Rights, the Space Program, the Cold War, even what we ate, was about to change forever.

Were you born in 1961, boomers? If not, what do you recall about that momentous year?

Some Boomers Are Feeling Old These Days

Are you feeling old these days? Is that what’s gotten you down, bunky? It’s understandable. If you watch TV or read the news, glimpses of boomer days past come rushing into focus. Memories of getting a polio or swine flu vaccine, to watching space launches, have been brought to the forefront with today’s headlines. Once you realize these memories are from 40, 50 or even 60-plus years ago, our currently sequestered minds can wonder, where have the years gone? Mister Boomer’s moment of suddenly feeling old arrived this past week when he heard and read news about two pop culture icons ever-present in the boomer years: Tom and Jerry cartoons and Mr. Potato Head toys.

TV commercials are informing us that Tom & Jerry: the Movie has been released in some theaters and specific streaming platforms. Tom and Jerry cartoons predate the Boomer Generation by a few years, but there was not a time when boomers didn’t have a chance to see these cat-and-mouse chases. From 1940 to 1957, Tom and Jerry cartoons were created by William Hanna and Joseph Barbera as movie shorts for MGM studios. In 1963, MGM licensed the cartoon to the legendary Chuck Jones (Looney Tunes, Road Runner), who had left Warner Brothers. His Sib Tower 12 Productions company created Tom and Jerry cartoons for MGM until 1967. Various Tom and Jerry movie shorts were then broadcast on TV beginning in 1965. The first new Tom and Jerry cartoons produced for TV didn’t arrive until 1975, and have pretty much been around ever since.

While Mister B can’t say he is familiar with any Tom and Jerry cartoons beyond the 1960s, he does know it gained the reputation as among the most violent ever produced. Tom, the cat, was ever in pursuit of Jerry, the mouse. Despite the size differential, Jerry often had the upper hand. Whacks and wallops with various mallets, frying pans, boards and more, were regular occurrences. Explosions, fire singes, plus meat cleaver amputations and bisectional knife slices and dices of Tom were part of the vernacular. There was never any blood in Tom and Jerry, and the two characters would be at it again in the next cartoon.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VRKOTdpCYK4

Commercials indicate some of the same slapstick violence is present in the new movie, but Mister B wonders how the entire premise will hold an audience today. It was not among his favorite cartoons, as Mr. B preferred his violence as portrayed in The Road Runner. This new movie won’t be on his view list.

In business news this past week, it was revealed that Hasbro decided to drop the gender-specific title of “Mr. Potato Head” on its packaging, to just “Potato Head.” A true boomer-era toy that was invented in 1949, Mr. Potato Head was manufactured and distributed in 1952. While Hasbro claims to want to “promote gender equality and inclusion,” Mister B thinks it was merely a marketing exercise to avoid having to make more than one package for Mr. and Mrs. Potato Head; the company had already said it was going to continue to produce both of the toys, only now it will be packaged as “The Potato Head Family.” The toys themselves are and were, by societal norms, leaning extremely gender-specific. Mr. Potato Head still has a clip-on mustache, not usually associated with female potatoes. And Mrs. Potato Head still has longer eyelashes attached to her clip-on eyes, a feature not regularly associated with males outside of glam rock or Goth. However, boomer children were never required to use specific parts in their potato creations any more than they were required to color the sky blue. Well, that may be a bad analogy and a story for another time, but Mister B thinks you get the idea. The whole point of toys like Mr. Potato Head, like a lot of boomer-era toys, was that the child creates the play scene, using the toy parts (in this case) as the platform for personal creativity.

What does that have to do with feeling old? Think back to your first Mr. Potato Head, boomers. There was no “potato” in the box, only plastic eyes, ears, noses, mouths, arms and legs, plus accessories like hats and glasses. The potato in Mr. Potato Head was a REAL potato boomers had to get from their moms. Kids could use other vegetables or fruits soft enough to receive the plastic parts as well, like peppers, zucchini, cucumbers, peaches or apples. Hasbro first introduced a plastic potato in the box in 1964.

Multiple internet sources repeat the pop history claim that Mr. Potato Head was the first toy advertised in a TV commercial, but Mister B has not been able to independently verify the claim. Nonetheless, the toy was there, advertised in the early days of TV and the Boomer Generation. Mister Boomer had the version that required real fruits or vegetables. There were several versions of the kit available, with or without Mrs. Potato Head. Mister B’s kit came with Mr. Potato Head’s car. That, my boomer friends, was more than 60 years ago.

Do Tom and Jerry cartoons and Mr. Potato Head bring back happy memories, boomers, or are they reminders of how much water has flowed under the bridge?